How to Write a Strong Hook

As authors, we tend to churn over the same ideas endlessly. Especially our hooks…

I spent weeks mulling over the hook in my first novel. I hear many new authors say the same thing. That’s why we came up with the Askew Challenge and its companion workbook. (If you missed the post on the Askew Challenge then check it out here: https://wp.me/p6ttEW-HF)

It’s natural to worry about those all important first moments of your story. Why?

The hook is your story’s do or die moment.

A strong hook means the reader wants to know what happens next—and, more importantly, will turn the page to find out. Keep that momentum going through the novel and you’re on your way to a 5-star review. We all know reviews are author lifelines, but that’s a post for a different day.

If you don’t hook your with your opening, they’re going to put the book down and find something else to do. No pressure.

“So, how do I craft a strong hook?”

For a satisfying character arc, your character needs to end the story at a complete 180° away from where they begin.

  • Know your ending.
  • Start your character at a polar opposite point.
  • Place the hook as early as possible.
  • Make the reader ask a question.
  • Make the reader care.

As an author, our job is to engage the reader. That’s the hook’s entire purpose. It hooks the reader on our story.

An effective hook will capture the reader’s senses and pull them into the story.

Make the hook pack a punch and force the reader to ask why, who, what, where, or when.

Make them want to turn the page to find the answers.

That’s it. It really is that easy, sometimes we as authors just tend to overthink it.

Still not sure how to craft a strong hook?

Join the Askew Challenge www.Facebook.groups/rhetoricaskew workshop and grab a copy of the workbook. We’ll help you craft a powerful hook.

Hook the Reader.
Hook Your Reader From the First Line.

 

via: churn

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