Greymoor Hall

Happy Halloween! In honor of my favorite time of year, may I present for your reading enjoyment, a small poem. The form is known as a CHANT ROYAL, and this is an example of a double-refrained version. The meter is a rarely used one, with a difficult name (tertius paeonic) but an easy beat (one-two-THREE-four)….

Exploring Classical Poetry — 08

The Kyrielle   Like many of the French refrain forms, the kyrielle originated in the 15th century with  the traveling troubadours. It is a rhymed form, written in either 2 line couplets, or 4 line stanzas (also known as quatrains). Each couplet or quatrain contains a repeating line or phrase as a refrain which usually…

Exploring Classical Poetry — 07

The Limerick   The history of the poetry form we know as the Limerick is rich and wild. There are examples of the limerick’s cadence and pattern in use as early as the 11th century, and Shakespeare used the form and meter as part of a few of his plays, including as a drinking song…

Exploring Classical Poetry — 06

The Terza Rima   Dating to the thirteenth century, the terza rima (Italian for “third rhyme”) is a classic form of writing poetry in three-line stanzas called tercets, which are interlinked by their rhyming pattern. They use the ending sound from each tercet’s middle line, as the first and third of the next, creating the…

Exploring Classical Poetry — 05

The Sestina   The sestina originated among the troubadours of medieval France’s Provence region, and the modern thirty-nine line form is attributed to one of these traveling poet entertainers of the twelfth century, Arnaut Daniel. Daniel’s sestina form was admired by Dante Alighieri, who introduced it to Italian poetry as well. This is one of…